1078 Comments

Thank you for an honest and raw piece on autism. As the mother of a 32 year old on the spectrum who can’t keep a job and stopped trying before the pandemic, I appreciate it. I am so tired of the autism is cute crowd and specials like Love on the Spectrum who make it appear as though this is a lovable and easily manageable problem for most people. My heart goes out to you and your family.

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Jul 20, 2023Liked by Jill Escher

My autistic son, another Jonathan, is 28, and I agree completely about the autism is cute image. 10 years ago, the DSM eliminated Aspergers Syndrome as a diagnosis and folded it into Autism Spectrum Disorder. This gave the public a distorted image of what autism actually looks like for the overwhelming majority of families. And it created the identity politics neurodiversity movement. Because people with Aspergers can speak for themselves and people with more profound autism cannot, this spread the idea that autism looks like Extraordinary Attorney Woo.

Thank you, Jill, for your article, and Bari, for publishing it. It is true that public services are not prepared to handle the tsunami of autistic adults who are in desperate need of services. In the short term, it is up to those parents who can to help fill in the gap. In our community, we started a nonprofit that provides job training and employment for autistic adults (we serve about 100 young people a year), and we are in the process of starting a group home. Yes, government needs to do more, but parents can do a lot. And the more parents start programs, the more models are out there to show what works and what doesn't.

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agreed. i keep having people ask me if my 8 year old son is a genius, whether i've seen any extraordinary tendencies emerge. Is he the next Elon......I'm honestly just excited that he used a fork correctly today. Little things really

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Jul 20, 2023·edited Jul 20, 2023Liked by Jill Escher

I have a 22 yo who still struggles with utensils, he has poor fine

motor skills. But boy oh boy, can he ever hit a golf ball.

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Jul 20, 2023Liked by Jill Escher

I have a 32 year-old son living with me. When he was tiny, I called him, "Sunny Jim." Absolutely no fear of anyone, no night terrors, always so very happy and well-behaved, loved by everybody instantly. He seemed quite precocious and dearly loved any machinery; I still have a video of him digging a giant hole with my backhoe on my farm, three years old and alone on the machine - so small that he had to stand behind the levers to operate them, rather than sitting on the seat.

Once he reached school age, it was a very different thing. He was very disruptive in school, with almost zero impulse control; a classroom observer's report related that the most amazing thing was that the other children could get anything done at all. He was eventually diagnosed with ADHD, and after more than a year of resisting, we put him on medication. As is the usual case, his behavior improved, but his grades did not.

He tested IQ 118 all across the board - basically high normal. His "splinter skills," we called them - such as self-taught computer programming - were nothing less than spectacular, but if he had no interest in a subject, he could not pass.

Fast forward. He is now 32, has never been able to hold a job, and lives with me. I'm working to get him out in the workforce, but secondarily planning long-term support for when I'm gone. (I just turned seventy.)

There IS an answer for this. What is it?

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Jul 20, 2023·edited Jul 20, 2023Liked by Jill Escher

Sorry, Jim. My boy dropped out of college one semester shy of a biochem degree. He was diagnosed with ADHD as a sophomore and put on Adderall which was a wonder drug according to him. I'm not happy he's on it, his sleep schedule is so messed up. He also has OCD, co-morbidities are very common with Aspies. He can't hold a traditional job. All he's doing now is Door Dash. He does live independently but only because we pay his rent. He struggles so much with everyday life. We are fortunate that we can financially support him, unlike so many others. He has sisters and they know someday he will be their responsibility.

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I had a psychiatry professor who told me that he was preordained for psychiatry. His mother was bipolar - then called manic-depressive psychosis, and he told me that as a high school chemistry lab assistant, he could still see in his mind's eye the lithium carbonate sitting on the shelf, and that he always thought how slipping a teaspoon of it into his mother's coffee would have let the family live a normal life. I have this horrible recurring thought that the answer to autism is somewhere right in front of our face, too, and we just cannot see it.

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deletedJul 22, 2023Liked by Jill Escher
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Could it be that these people like your son are simply not designed for a post modern society? Hunters, gatherers, high intuitive ones, broken things fixers, bakers, community mood creators / maintainers..?

I can’t help thinking about all these important human roles that got abandoned in a post industrial society.

Could this be an answer..?

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Jul 21, 2023Liked by Jill Escher

No offense meant, but no.

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I see why some disagree with you but I agree to the extent that getting jobs in the corporate world in large businesses is a lot harder for some than if they just grew up and did whatever dad did, as kids may have done pre 19th century. I work as a programmer and remember when my old (smaller) company hired this autistic guy who was very quirky and people had this attitude of "we took a chance on him" and I always wondered if it was hard for him to get a job elsewhere because he'd probably bomb the interviews. But he was very verbal, unlike the focus of the kids and young adults of this article.

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For some. If I'd been caught a lot earlier.... Not a lot of help though if you are Classical/Kanners. For every idiot-savant who gets to be a media darling or whose particular whizz can be monetised, there will be 99 who never get out of the Terrible Twos and worse. I'd pretty much alienated my Mum and all my siblings long before I found out what was actually going on. I think we'll have to catch the train pretty much as, if not before, it derails. Once those neural pathways are set it is going to be very uphill even if it becomes possible.

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I can see a use for AI here. Let's say the autistic person has a job like flipping burgers. The AI is hooked up to the incoming orders list, and can prompt the autist what to make. For a normal person this would mean displaying the orders list as is, but depending on the various ways the autistic person can become distracted or lose focus, they may need steering along various paths to get back on track. Steering inputs might include a generated voice talking continuously in their ear, visual cues (possibly delivered via augmented reality glasses), and bracelets or gloves that vibrate in a variety of ways. In short, turn the autist into an industrial robot with an AI control system. A single feedback system that also prompts for narratives like "go shopping", "do laundry" and "clean my room" would spread any available development funding over as much of patients' lives as possible, while allowing the control system to match the autist's mood over a whole day, not just a single activity.

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Really good thought.

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Hello

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That was a test

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Hello, and welcome!

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Jul 20, 2023Liked by Jill Escher

Agree. I am thankful that the Asperger's term is being used again. It might be on the same spectrum, but the symptoms display very differently

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Exactly. I'm actually not certain my boys would qualify (doesn't language delay exclude Aspergers's) but they are closer to that than to Jill's kids described in this piece and I feel weirdly guilty about even using the same words to describe such different levels of impairment and need.

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I think this is a problem across the board in mental health. The dumbing down of mental illnesses into quirkiness, as well as the celebration of 'mental diversity' both do nothing for patients who are smack in the middle of a psychic hurricane and suffering.

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Jul 20, 2023Liked by Jill Escher

I agree, Pippi and Charlie G. My sons has an ASD diagnosis but he is more "Good Doctor" version but without the savant situation. And even so, it isn't cute or any sort of identity to celebrate.

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Jul 20, 2023Liked by Jill Escher

To me, I believe the intention is to bring awareness rather than to "cutify." I have an Aspie son and I welcome educating people on how to identify the characteristics so people can think "he's on the spectrum" rather than "he's a weirdo."

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I’m all for efforts that increase opportunities and acceptance for those disabled by autism — I put my heart into many such efforts, at all ends of the spectrum. My primary concern however is with the research and policy spheres increasingly sugar coating autism.

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for all those wanting to dig further into the issue the midwestern Dr just brought out this piece explaining some possible causality for autism https://www.midwesterndoctor.com/p/how-do-vaccines-cause-autism?

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Why are Xtianity, Judaism, and Islam all called "Abrahamic religions"?

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To summarize: We have no idea what causes autism or why the numbers are suddenly exploding. But it’s definitely not the 70 plus injections of chemical immune stimulants and toxins that children born since the 1980s receive. The vaccine studies funded by the pharmaceutical companies prove they are totally safe and definitely don’t cause autism. Also, the only people who think the exploding number of childhood vaccines might have some negative consequences are conspiracy theorists and cranks, by definition. So it must be...well, just something else that we can’t put our finger on just yet.

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Great summary. The post-truth doldrums must escalate to a truth typhoon if we want any meaningful change. We cannot rule out any variables like vaccines. Correlation is not causation and many factors should be analyzed, but the stonewalling and gaslighting about these injections raises alarm bells. Parental age has been going up on the same precipitous slope as the amount of mandated vaccines.

Two other environmental factors were not covered. One is the toxins in our water and food. Studies have found that almost half of the drinking water in the US is contaminated with forever chemicals like PFAS. Most of our food is full of GMOs, preservatives, and other chemicals that were not present a generation ago. The other is lifestyle. Screen time has replaced socialization for many, compounded by the heinous COVID lockdowns. Stress and atomization are bad for mental health, which does autism no favors.

As a parent, my heart goes out to Jill and any others who are caring for autistic children and adults. They deserve justice. We must have courage to fight for those who are unable to.

Thank you to The Free Press for advancing this vital dialogue.

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All my daughters cannot conceive and suffer miscarriages. I had 4 healthy children without batting an eye as did all my friends of that era. What happened in a generation? Vaccines, GMOs, microplastics (all our food was in paper in the 60s) glyphosate spraying, and most of all stress. What we have done to our children is unforgivable.

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Hell, we spray Roundup on crops that we've made resistant to it and think that's normal? Many of the substances we've introduced to modern life are relatively new and we have little to no idea of their effect. As if we can count on the FDA and EPA....

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Yes-maybe ask these folks about that FDA approved miracle drug, Thalidomide.

https://usthalidomide.org/group/member-levels/

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Jul 20, 2023Liked by Jill Escher

Actually, thalidomide was not approved in the US until the late 1990s, and then only for the cutaneous manifestations of leprosy. It later (around 2006) achieved approval to treat multiple myeloma, and it actually IS a bit of a miracle drug. The issues with phocomelia stemmed from use in Europe, and once the horrible effects on developing fetuses was discovered, led to the strengthening of laws (and the FDA) here in the US. See, at one point, the FDA actually WAS an agency working to protect patients. I believe those days are long gone. This book is an excellent historical reference source:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1422397.Dark_Remedy

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Yup

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Thanks, Dude.

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The use of seed oil also went up during that period.

You mistake correlation for causation.

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A bit hyperbolic, eh? Plenty of women are still getting pregnant just fine, particularly those who are healthy (not overweight) and young.

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Is unforgivable Nancy!

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Although I don't watch any of TV news (propaganda channels), I am a voracious reader and I found this article about a month ago:

https://scitechdaily.com/a-drug-that-cures-autism-neuroscience-study-yields-promising-results/?expand_article=1

Let's hope this works. It is cheap and already FDA approved.

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We have a close friend that started on it this Spring. The jury is out, but "cure" is always a strong. word for Autism families...

Thanks for posting.

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Thanks for sharing this experience.

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Cheap and FDA approved. But not for treatment of autism..You know how that goes. If big Pharma can't make money....

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“Cheap and already FDA approved”. Sounds like a death knell to me.

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Thanks for sharing!!!

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Maybe just click bait.

SciTechDaily lacks transparency as they do not disclose ownership on the website. Some online sources claim SciTechDaily is owned by DailyEDeals, a company that provides advertising and coupons to large chain stores. However, we are unable to confirm their ownership. Advertising generates revenue.

https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/scitechdaily/

A lot of technical stuff I didn’t understand and a reference to autism with no specificity

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https://www.nature.com/articles/s41380-023-01959-7

The paper is open access, so you can judge for yourself as far as you are able.

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Sounds like the Alzheimer's crap that is super expensive and never works.

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Early doors. The first question I'd ask is where they sourced the mice.

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I wondered that. How do you know a mouse is autistic?

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With the decline in socialization comes a rise in isolation. It is telling that loneliness is arguably the number one risk factor for premature mortality. An analysis of 300,000 people in 148 studies found that loneliness is associated with a 50% increase in mortality from any cause, making it comparable to smoking 15 cigarettes a day, and much more dangerous than obesity. It is very possible that it could contribute to autism in some way. (And yes, it's another reason why covid lockdowns were so incredibly stupid.)

https://theconversation.com/loneliness-on-its-way-to-becoming-britains-most-lethal-condition-94775

https://www.harvardmagazine.com/2021/01/feature-the-loneliness-pandemic

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This is so deeply important to talk about. Please keep sharing these articles and bringing this topic to the table. I can’t think of any factor that matters more for mental and even the physical health. Thank you.

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We can rule out the original argument that MMR vaccines are causally related to autism. The original article was exposed as a fraud.

See (former) Dr. Andrew Jeremy Wakefield.

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To add to your environmental factors, go take a look at obesity metrics. Over 82% of Americans over 18 are overweight or obese. Pregnancies from obese mothers are known to cause hypoxia and malourishment of the fetus.

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While I don’t doubt that this is responsible for a number of health issues, it seems that it would be very easy to show if there is a strong enough correlation with autism to explain even some of the rise. I’ve got to imagine that this has been done with some of the larger population studies.

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Every time I cut up strawberries in non-summer months, I remember that as a child, there were NO strawberries other than in the summer, and we gorged ourselves! Same for all the summer fruits. The food and water supply have changed so dramatically, I tend to think this is a HUGE boulder that gov't doesn't want to look under - too scary.

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Your conflation of “GMO’s” with environmental toxins puts your entire position in immediate doubt... We have been living with GMO’s since the beginning of plant domestication... typical visceral reaction to what is not “natural” dressed up as rationality

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Roundup Corn was specifically bred to be used with RoudUp pesticide which has been ruled a carcinogen in Europe etc.... Yes, we have been engineering plants for eons, witness the tulip. But some of these GMOs are seriously f'd up. And we are now crossing mammal cells with plant cells etc. You trot out this claim but it's so broad as to be useless

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I agree that it is possible to engineer a pathogen (perhaps Covid) but it’s also possible to create poison “naturally”. We would be foolish to turn our backs on GMO as we would other novel methods of farming. The devil is in the details (though I suspect many anti GMO types are more about religion of a sort than pragmatic rationality) also Round Up is surely a concern and the genetic engineering of plants to work with it makes one question but it does not necessarily follow that the plants are poisonous because they can resist poison but the concern is certainly understandable)

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The environmental toxins affect the pregnant person. All municipal water supplies have carcinogenic compounds. We should ask about the kinds of stressors upon pregnant women as compared to in times past, although deep poverty and average poverty historically affected poor pregnant women. Therefore I mean toward toxins and the effect of radiation from all sources which cumulatively is a lot of disruptive radiation. The number of vaccines given in a short time is still a notable factor. So, might be anxiety and its resulting inflammatory effects on pregnant women. While women in the 19th c English working class suffered a lot of physical abuse from husbands and employment, social historians do not reveal the kind of anxiety and its companion, inflammation as we have known since the wars of the 20th c

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You mean pregnant WOMAN.

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We live in a world where the origin of a global pandemic was hidden from the populace for 3+ years when the powers- that-be knew the truth and we still believe everything the cdc and medical

Community say about vaccines. This said I do believe we Can have the vaccine conversation if we separate out the “traditional” vaccines from the new vaccines and discuss mono-valent vaccines VW the grouped and multi-use preserved (thimerisol) ones.

We have a terrible track record here in the US of engaging these debates from 10,000 feet and never set the specific terms of the conversation. We allow the opposition to discount our arguments because we do not speak about our concerns or assertions using careful language.

I opted out of natal vaccines (at birth) and demanded mono-valent (non-preserved) versions of vaccines for my children who had high risk due to heredity. Parents need to be staunch advocates.

All this said, the author’s kowtowing to ignore

Vaccines or environmental factors like plastics, chemicals, drugs, toxins etc. is surprising. And with the potential costs for care being assumed by the government, it is surprising to ignore these factors when determining causality would help pinpoint the culprits (corporations) who might help fund this care long term.

In the end progressive politics will ruin any interest in stemming the incidence of this disability. So vote from an informed standpoint and don’t allow your care for liberal ideas to enact bad ideas over the long term.

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The author who has been active in autism work for decades is kowtowing? Your bonafides are what, exactly?

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You are proving my exact point. Thanks for being triggered. It’s exactly what I said 😂

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The author states that 1 in 36 children have autism yet a study on INSAR (International Society for Autism Research) found 1 in 271 Amish children met the Autism criteria. Am I missing something? Why the disparity?

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Amish do not vaccinate, grow their own food and shun most modern conveniences emitting radiation.

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Jul 21, 2023·edited Jul 23, 2023

They also do not use cannabis.

No one wants to talk about that, either.

Edit: There are studies about paternal cannabis use and autism - here is a recent one: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6961656/

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Probably why I could never be Amish :)

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Jul 20, 2023·edited Jul 20, 2023

My guess is that the Amish have kids at much younger ages than the average American.

The human body was not made to make kids in one's late 30's or 40's, and that includes both parents. Kids should be had in one's 20's.

The genetic material that's passed on to children degrades significantly as people age, hence the increased number of spontaneous abortions, or the difficulty to conceive at relatively older ages. Worse genes equal more congenital diseases.

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Except lots of people who've had their kids in their twenties have children with autism. Also, before the era of birth control (aka nearly all of human history), women were having huge families, giving birth through their 30 and into their 40s with no high rates of autism to show for it.

All of which is to say: this argument is a red herring, brought to you by Pharma and its shills in the medical industrial complex and media. Don't fall for it.

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“Also, before the era of birth control (aka nearly all of human history), women were having huge families, giving birth through their 30 and into their 40s with no high rates of autism to show for it.”

Provided of course, they didn’t die in childbirth - which, at one point in American history, they had a 1%-2% chance of doing with each birth.

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True point. In 1992, were it not for the miracle of emergency C-sections, my oldest would have died in utero and I would have died while trying—with no possibility of success—to give birth to a stillborn baby.

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I had a planned C-section, but yeah, my older daughter and I would be dead too. She was not only breech, but partially twisted to the side; the OB had to cut my uterus open even wider partway through. In the olden days, I probably would have bled to death trying unsuccessfully to push her out. Eerie to think about!

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👍🏻👍🏻

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Jul 20, 2023Liked by Jill Escher

I had two children - one at 38 and the other at 41. Both healthy. I’m not convinced that is a cause of autism. Correlation, maybe. Increased risk factors having children later in life? Yes. But autism? Not provable at this point.

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I had one at 30, my second at 32 and my third at 37. First two are neurotypical, third has Asperger’s. Father is 1.5 years older than me.

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While this study does show some correlation with paternal age, I don’t think it shows a compelling enough relationship to explain what’s going on. And it shows no correlation with maternal age.

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Correlation is not causation. And this is rather poor correlation.

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But many Amish women also continue having babies through their child bearing years ie into their early forties. I don’t understand this argument. Also historically speaking women still had children “late” -- yes they started young, but they kept bearing children as long as they were still capable of reproducing.

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My mother (youngest of thirteen) was born when her mother was 44. Twelve of the thirteen children survived into adulthood and had children of their own--one child died from pneumonia at age 5.

Both my mother and her mother lived into their 80's with decent health overall.

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As an aging boomer with autistic progeny, I despair we will ever find the cause of autism. When I look back on my childhood, the known potential sources of problems include: playing in the neighbors insulated (with asbestos) crawl space, riding my banana seat bike behind the DDT fogger: “I’m up in the clouds!”; pot smoked in high school (Mexican with that stuff the DEA sprayed on it); not to mention incidental forays with cocaine, opium, hash, meth, heroin, etc. It’s sounds like I’m a horrific druggie, but I promise you I was just a typical college student hanging out in the 70’s. It’s actually kind of ridiculous that no one seems to even consider the effect of the culturally encouraged drug experimentation that was (and still is?) rife in this country.

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It could be. I have a family member who has slight autism and has had about 1/2 of the recommended vaccines. His mother was 21 when he was born.

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Both of my great grandmothers had 12 children. Which means they were still giving birth well into their 40s. Not uncommon for Catholic families of that generation. No autistic children.

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My father was the 9th of 10 children. My grandmother was 40 when she gave birth to him and 42 when she had her last child. No autism. One of my husband's grandmothers had 12 kids, same story; the oldest of those kids had 15 children, same story. This new line of inquiry into autism causes is a made-up excuse to avoid asking the more obvious questions.

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Could be. But then again you wouldn't be a good parent if you weren't inclined to straw-clutch for your child.

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This was exactly my thought--

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We also do not talk about the effects of drugs like cannabis. A 45 year old dad who's been smoking pot for 30 years - could that possibly have an effect on the genetic material in his sperm? Of course it could.

The rise in cannabis use correlates directly with the rise in autism.

I'm spitballing, but I will say that of the many parents I know with autistic kids, in almost every family the dad was/is a significant pot smoker. Of course, I know lots of pot smokers with healthy children, too.

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My 19 year old step daughter was conceived when her mother was 21. She’s nonverbal & about as severely incapacitated as a person can be. She’s a perma-toddler, intelligence wise

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Jul 22, 2023·edited Jul 22, 2023

It might be associated with the age of the mother when she has her first child (primigravidas) vs. later children (multi para). As a mother of three, I’ve experienced the storm of hormones that comes with pregnancy and childbirth. Perhaps they are protective of later pregnancies?

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Amish kids aren’t diagnosed.

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Then how would they get the 1 in 271 statistic?

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But if autism is severely disabling 3% of all children, there would be no way that wouldn't be obvious among the Amish.

More broadly, I wonder what cross-societal studies exist on this subject? Japanese? Rural vs urban? Mediterranean? African? All of these have radically different lifestyles and diets. That seems like a good place to start. Also compare Americans to Western Europeans... we're genetically similar, dietarily similar, and both WEIRD. Are there lots of autism cases in W. Europe? I don't know, but again, worth asking.

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A lot of late diagnosis going on in England. I'm fed up of tripping over other adult diagnosed Aspies.

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This is an interesting possibility. Do Amish shun traditional healthcare/doctors as well?

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Different criteria?

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Well done.

My Dad was an Infectious Disease MD, and I am father to Dustin, my vaccine injured son with Autism. Specific to my son in my longer article I identified "cause as":

https://outsidein51.substack.com/p/pro-vaccine-safety-in-2023-where

"the root of Dusty’s autism was a combination of a genetic pre-disposition plus egregious environmental assaults."

"At some point in that first year, he had his third DPT vaccine dose. That was the shot that put him over the edge. He screamed for 24 hours, and the babbling stopped. The language that typically follows never came."

We are focused on building a better life for Dustin and his friends at https://www.endeavor21.org

#AeternusUmbra (watch forever)

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I just started following your Substack—it was recommended to me by another commenter. My heart and prayers go out to Dustin and you and your family.

I wish Bari had the open-mindedness/guts/honesty to feature your story, whether as an essay or an interview. But she has a glaring agenda here, and her biases have blinded her on this topic. :-(

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As you know, my other son is in the Navy, and is fully vaccinated. I assume this, as his security clearance excludes me!!

This game of life is complicated. I appreciate Substack for the openness. Bari is on the right track. Thanks

PS - I am trying to not get sucked into the vaxx conversation, and prefer to make Dustin's world better. We have a really great team here at Endeavor21 - https://www.endeavor21.org

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I appreciate and honor your focus on making Dustin's world better and not being sucked in. I know someone with a vax-injured son who takes the same useful approach. Vaccine safety is a critical issue, but one that can be fought for by the growing legions of people who have your back. If the pandemic has a silver lining, it's that it woke up many in the slumbering masses. For that I am grateful.

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Why were both sons vaccinated but only one has autism?

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Probably the same reason only some young boys get myocarditis from the mRNA vaccines. We’re all different.

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Do you need to always be a jerk. I was hoping you and your partner Kevin were on an extended vacation. I

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It certainly did wake up many.

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I love the term you use "pro-vaccine safety" in your blog. It's so logical and fair-minded.

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I asked my daughter who is pregnant with my first grandchild to please do more research on vaccines and don’t agree just Willy nilly. They give DTAP during pregnancy now. Oh hell no. Hep B at birth…double hell no.

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founding
Jul 21, 2023·edited Jul 21, 2023

We know from the Vaccine Court that there are a few rare vaccine reactions that cause brain injuries with Autism symptoms. The vaccine court has paid out the largest $$$$ to these cases because they engender lifelong dependency. However, looking at the numbers the increase in Autism to astronomic levels happened mostly after the rise of total vaccinations happened, pointing to different causes. My heart goes out to all, whether a vaccine injury or unexplained cause.

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I grew up in the 40's and 50's. Every summer parents sweated bullets because in the warmer months polio reared it's ugly head. Every summer thousand of children came down with polio and were crippled for life and some died.

Jonas Salk solved this horrible fate with the polio vaccine. Polio is almost wiped out here in the US. Whooping cough, diphtheria and other diseases we now never hear of today were wiped out by vaccines.

Should we study and watch vaccines to find flaws? Yes, of course. But only an idiot would want to get rid of them. Twenty or thirty years ago WHO declared small pox to be eradicated in the world. Small pox has killed and disfigured millions of people but it was eradicated by the small pox vaccine.

I say again, only an idiot would want to get rid of vaccines!

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Or, instead of getting rid of vaccines, we could test them properly for safety. And test the whole schedule, which is being constantly added to (the covid shot, which "protects" children against a virus that doesn't harm them, was added just this year). One could say that only an idiot would want to keep adding injections that haven't been inert-placebo tested to a schedule for children that has, itself, not been tested for cumulative safety.

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Look at the results. Polio, gone. Small pox, gone. I could go on and on.

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Actually, polio is still here. It's just called other things. And so are "iron lungs" —they're called respirators. I highly recommend the book Dissolving Illusions by Dr. Suzanne Humphries for the evidenced-based history of disease decline that didn't make it into the medical books/establishment narrative. It's eye/mind opening.

https://www.amazon.com/Dissolving-Illusions-Disease-Vaccines-Forgotten/dp/1480216895/ref=sr_1_1?crid=38FKPCHNRG28J&keywords=dissolving+illusions+by+suzanne+humphries&qid=1689866811&sprefix=dissolving%2Caps%2C701&sr=8-1

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I know polio is still around. Just this year a dozen cases popped up in the eastern states. but for all practical purposes it is all but eradicated.

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Here's what I mean: when the Salk vaccine came out (which protected against the 2-3 most common strains of virus that triggered polio symptoms) and mass vax campaigns started, whenever people came down with those symptoms they were asked if they'd received the polio vaccine. If the answer was no they were then counted as a polio statistic. If they answered yes, they were not, and their paralytic symptoms were given a different name (e.g. acute transverse myelitis). That is the magic trick that dropped the polio numbers so shockingly, such that everyone began believing "the polio vaccine eradicated polio." No, it didn't. They just recategorized what "polio" is. There's far more to the story than that, but this gives you an idea of the "science" behind the narrative.

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People love to say correlation isn’t causation when it suits their argument.

The diseases are gone is a statement of correlation, not causation.

Besides that, it matters less whether a disease disappears than whether our susceptibility to dying or or being permanently harmed from it decreases and disappears.

For instance, deaths and harm from measles had declined precipitously before the vaccine was on the market. Scientists and doctors honestly thought that nobody would want a measles vaccines. Parents certainly weren’t asking for it.

So, not unlike with Covid, a scare campaign was required in order to get people on board with the measles vaccine. The same thing is happening with a chicken pox vaccine. As fewer adults now have had chickenpox as children they’re more susceptible to scare campaigns about chicken pox, but any of us who had it as children know that this is a joke.

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Well, we have flu vaccines every year and the flu doesn't seem to be going anywhere.

I only bring that up to point out that all vaccines are not the same. Heck, for all we know only a specific vaccine could be the problem. Or a specific vaccine+some other factor(s). Or a combo of vaccines, etc etc. Or nothing to do with vaccines at all

Ultimately, as you said previously, we need to continue to study them, especially as we add more and more to what kids are getting. As it stands, we seem to approve any old drugs that may or may not even do what they claim. We also need to ask if all vaccines are necessary. If, say, polio is no longer a killer it was in the 50's (lets face it, we have made a few medical improvements since them) then maybe it isn't needed anymore (I am not suggesting this is actually the case, just as a hypothetical about how we can't assume that something from the past needs to remain forever the same).

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Flu vaccines don't claim to prevent the disease 100%. Every years the flu virus mutates and that is why you take it every year.

This is an apocryphal example. When my wife and I moved back to the States we did not get the flu vaccine and we came down with the disease. We thought we had to die to get better.

That was 30 years ago. We get the vaccine every year now and we have never come down with the flu since.

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And I have never gotten the vaccine and haven't gotten the flu in probably a decade. And when I do get it, it lasts a day or 2 tops, which I feel slightly bad. As for even more anecdotal evidence, most people I know that DO get the flu regularly is actually FROM the vaccine. They have worse symptoms from it than I did back when I last gotten it.

Again, I am not anti-vaccine. I have all my mandated shots, including Covid. I just don't get flu shots because the flu has never been a concern for me.

I AM however for more info, as I do not trust our institutions anymore, as they have proven they will lie to use if they find it convenient.

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I think you mean anecdotal, not apocryphal.

I haven't had the flu in 30 years and I've never gotten the vaccine.

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It occurs to me that we MIGHT want to stop spending so much time arguing about vaccines about which I suspect most people have already made up their minds and start thinking about what we can do to prevent the diseases that will need more vaccines down the pike.

Will Big Pharma give us a vaccine for the rise in peanut allergies - celiac disease gut problems - nervous disorders, etc. or will we seriously start considering what we might be doing to our food sources be they dairy, beef, chicken, fish ( think Tuna) etc.

One friend who now lives in Mexico told me that although she was always f very careful about what she ate, she was always sick in the States--stomach and bowel, issues, high blood pressure, no energy, etc. She finally said enough and moved to Mexico at the urging of friends hoping to find a magic cure. There was no magic - just a change in diet - . . . She now eats homemade tacos off food carts on the street - shops at the local truly organic markets for her veggies and fruit and plays pickle ball three times a week. Roundup is not used. -.

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LP think the polio vac took 7 years of testing it wasn’t a 6 month job.

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And after you're done with Dissolving Illusions, read Turtles All The Way Down.

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Aug 2, 2023·edited Aug 2, 2023

https://naturalselections.substack.com/p/childhood-vaccines-arent-tested-against.

My sister lives in a late 19th century terrace. It has no foundations and you wouldn't have got away with building it seventy years ago, let alone now. Something that bleeding obvious a quote about it is attributed to Jesus.

We miss the FEKKIN' OBVIOUS ALL THE FEKKIN' TIME.

Let's hope your naivety doesn't come back and kick you in the teeth, eh?

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"I say again, only an idiot would want to get rid of vaccines!"

Agreed, and I would also say that only an idiot would want to get rid of antibiotics. But, like antibiotics, the excessive use of vaccines can create problems worse than the problem they claim to be solving. There is a sweet spot both for the use of antibiotics and vaccines, and we need to consider the risks in both cases.

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What if the idiot was on the right track? What if the idiot suggested these 70 year old vaccines may contain flaws? Must we follow the edict of the non-idiot and not even look to see? Who is the idiot anyway?

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I was fully vaccinated as a child, but I was a child in the 1950s and 1960s. My understanding is that kids today receive more vaccines, in higher doses, beginning earlier in childhood than was the case in the past. And the escalating use of vaccines correlates with escalating rates of autism, and we're still supposed to accept that there is no relation? The author links only to a couple bland, boilerplate, "Couldn't be the problem" statements. Why not deescalate? Why not start vaccinating later in infancy, according to a 60s or 70s model? Why not back off the front-loading? For the people who say "But what about epidemics?" It seems like the less intense dosing schedules did just fine in preventing them.

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Because that would hurt profits. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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Did you not read what I said? "Should we study and watch vaccines to find flaws? Yes, of course." Also without these vaccines tens of millions if not hundreds of millions of lives have been saved by vaccines. Doesn't that account for anything?

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Totally agree. Vaccinations may have flaws, but the data is irrefutable. They save countless lives and prevent life limiting infections.

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what if it is your kid reacting to a vaccine and you have to appeal to the National Vaccine Compensation Program? What do you say for those families? Tough luck?

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If the alleged vaccine injury is autism, then yes, it is tough luck. Autism is not listed as a vaccine injury under the National Vaccine Compensation Program since it’s been clinically proven that vaccines do not cause autism. Ask any law firm that specializes in vaccine injuries and they will tell you this is the case. There is a long list of what’s covered, but autism is not on the list.

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Otoh, death is covered. So if your child dies from the vaccine, you can get compensation. When you go to get your child vaccinated, they give you a list of all the various things that can happen as side effects, including death, but not including autism. You have to sign a paper acknowledging that you were warned, but accept the risk or they won’t vaccinate your child.

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founding

if further study and watch to find flaws is indicated, how can the conclusion of not getting rid of them be made?

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We are going to have to agree to disagree. I believe in vaccines and you don't. Let's leave it at that.

However, if you don't get the polio vaccine and contract the disease, I'll bet you money you'd wish you had taken the vaccine.

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This conclusion is non sequitur.

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Back in the olden timies when you had to go to the library to look thing up, as a kid I wanted to know the mortality rate of vaccines. I can't remember that far back but the number was minuscule.

If you save millions but a few dozen die, allergies, toxic reaction, etc. Do you halt the vaccine? I wouldn't. For the families of those who died it is a tragedy but to the millions it saved, it was a blessing.

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But do you stop research into the reasons some get injured and most don't? That is what most of us, including RFK Jr. are asking? Saying collateral damage doesn't matter because it is rare is not a good argument to me.

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Jul 20, 2023·edited Jul 20, 2023

e.g., "The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one." (Spock/Kirk Star Trek II)

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you don't have to get rid of them, but questioning is vital in Medicine - otherwise we would be performing lobotomies, the doctor who developed it got a Nobel Prize for it.

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I agree. Contrary to what the left says, science is never settled.

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Please listen to this: https://thehighwire.com/ark-videos/aaron-siri-gives-testimony-on-the-floor-of-arizona-state-senate/ Also, what's happening is vaccines are not as effective as natural immunity, so diseases are coming back on the vaccinated. And just like if you asked people who watch left leaning new, what is the chance of dying from COVID, they would say 50% (it's less than 1%), if you looked at the acual number of children who were dying from these diseases, it's a very small percentage. This site has a lot of data: https://thehighwire.com/watch/

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There is also the fact that a mother who has had measles passes that immunity on to the child, a mother who has the vaccine doesn't.

the capitalist agenda works by creating subscribers for life. this is not long term health and its not sustainable.

vaccines are one of many solutions depending on the context of the situation.

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" say again, only an idiot would want to get rid of vaccines!"

The bad news is there is an unending supply of idiots these days. The good news is natural selection; deadly diseases are Uncle Chuck Darwin's way of eliminating those who won't use the latest treatments and preventions that technology makes possible.

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Are you saying let's go back to the early 1800s where people died like flies from diseases we don't even worry about today?

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I'm saying that extinction will be the ultimate fate of those who don't vaccinate. Because of the low vaccination rate, Covid stays in circulation, and who knows how deadly the next variant might be?

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Covid vaccines do nothing to prevent circulation of the virus, they only reduce the intensity if/when you're infected. I was vaxxed and boosted, and got infected anyway, and I know many other people that had the same experience.

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Your chance of getting or giving the covid virus is the same irregardless of being vaccinated per the latest research. The problem with covid is that it is a virus variant that was new to the human race and hence no immunities. Each successive mutation has caused an increase in infectivity and decrease in lethality. Co-vid will morph into a cold variant, it will always be here. Iv’e had the initial 2 and the booster, being a bit of a geezer. That being said all vaccines are not created equal, sadly the co-vid vaccine was weak tea, luckily the virus itself was also. Compare the average age of death of the Spanish flu to co-vid.

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Polio is a success story. The rest of the 20th century infectious diseases (smallpox might be an exception to this for other reasons) had a 95% reduction in mortality and morbidity BEFORE the introduction of the vaccine to the population. And of course you fail to mention that the Salk Vaccine also caused cases of Polio and because of a manufacturing defect created 1000s of cases in the Western US and Canada. Sabin Vaccine turned out to be a better choice, but for political reasons he had to go to the USSR to test his vaccine. In 2 years he inoculated over 70 million Russian children to great success. The vaccine most of us baby boomers remember is the sugar cube Sabin vaccine given out at schools. There was a huge backlash against the Salk Vaccine after the manufacturing incident and people refused to take it until the Sabin Vaccine was introduced in the early 1960s. Even today, most of the world's Polio cases are vaccine derived strains. It's a success, but one that cost us in more Polio victims.

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Yes, my ex contracted polio from the polio vaccine when he took it in Kentucky in the late 50s. Still glad we have a polio vaccine, but people minimize the fallout and complications. Similarly, I got swine flu from the swine flu vax. Had a slight cold when I took it and opted for the nasal version, not realizing a live vaccine would be much worse... I went home and immediately got a high fever and screaming headache. Unlike any cold I have ever had. I rarely run fevers even when I have the flu, etc, and the headache was unreal. I tried to report this adverse reaction to the federal Vaccine registry, VAERS, and was told my illness was simply "coincidental" They did not take my report. I also tried to tell the doctors at the clinic that gave me the vaccine, to warn them about giving the live nasal vaccine to people who are sick with colds etc. They too ignored me and treated me like a crank. This has not led me to have confidence in our vaccine monitoring agencies. I vaccinated and boosted myself and my son for Covid, but I nevertheless have concerns.

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Agreed. Only a parent grossly unfamiliar with the underlying diseases they prevent would believe not vaccinating their children was a good idea. That said, I believe in bodily autonomy and think the state forcing people to put things into their body is extremely dangerous, so you have a complete right to be foolish if you want to. But don't bring your kid over to my house.

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I largely agree with you, as long as we do not lump in the covid vaccines with the ones you list. They are in an entirely different category, for multiple reasons.

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While I completely understand this perspective, I believe Polio was only serious for about 1% of people. If for example, the alternative was giving 3% of people autism, which route is preferable? It’s imperative that we at least have accurate data in order to make these important decisions.

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Except for the fact that ALL diseases were on a precipitous decline BEFORE the vaccines were even introduced.

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EXACTLY. thank you for saying it perfectly.

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Amazing she states so emphatically that it’s definitely NOT vaccines. Science ain’t what it used to be so you can exclude Nothing if you want to find out the truth of it. For God’s sake keep an open and humble mind Ms Escher

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Yep, amazing how the establishment quickly moved to "let's not investigate the origins anymore" and it is cited 2x here. I posted the following comment :

“ Now, prevention of autism is pretty much off the table” - this is a red flag. Covid -19 showed us how many medical institutions ( public and private) are captured financially . If you can’t find it, you need to re-research everything again and question, always question. Were the previous research captured? Who financed? Who does it benefit?

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Exactly! It’s just too painful for the parent to acknowledge that they gave the shot to the child. I have personal experience with this. This article started out from an extremely defensive point. Putting one’s head in the sand and denying the possibility that the pharmaceutical industry, fined billions of dollars for lies and deceit and wrongful death, is funding the studies and using that as your defense, gets us nowhere.

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Agreed. It might not be the vaccines but then WHAT is it?? Seems environmental considering the recent rapid rise! In addition why the explosion of childhood vaccines? Finally how do we ever regain trust in our lying Scientific community and our criminal Pharma community?? Until there is serious accountability for past lies, coverups and crime no trust can be built.

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There are enough anti-vaxers in America that it ought to be pretty easy to run autism tests on a set of them and a matched set of vaxing parents. If vaccines have a significant effect, such a study would find it. Robert Kennedy could fund such a thing himself, so why doesn't he?

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It’s not the vaccines. Get off this nonsense.

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What if it’s the mothers’ or the fathers’ vaccine history? Until and unless we know what *is* causing this, calling anything “nonsense” is wildly irresponsible.

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If OJ didn't do it, who did?

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Good one.

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To be fair, I stole it from my wife :)

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My thoughts exactly

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The autism from vaccinations theory, once had some believability, but if you read the post, research now finds the changes in the brain for the most part exist at birth and probably happen in-utero. While, I do agree with RFK Jr. that we should thoroughly research the totality of giving children 70+ vaccines (this should have been done decades ago), he is just wrong about the Autism/Vaccines link. Why he hasn't admitted as such is a mystery as he now must know. It's my biggest issue with him. Just the fact that autism continues to explode in the last 20 years while total vaccinations remain flat should be a big red flag. Causality doesn't equal causation as she pointed out in the post.

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What "research now finds" has everything to do with what research gets funded, and by whom. That theory does not take into account the legions of parents who had normally developing babies—healthy, meeting milestones like eye contact and smiling and typical infant engagement with others—who, post-vaccination, suddenly lost their social skills—no more eye contact, no smiling, no interpersonal engagement; new head banging, outbursts, etc..—and never returned to normal.

The Narrative™ needs to ignore the reality of those multitudes of parents. Once upon a time, before the era of ubiquitous camera phones, these parents were gaslit and told they were mistaken, they simply didn't realize their child wasn't developing normally. Fortunately, thanks to technology, those parents now have easily accessible and shareable before-and-after videos of their once healthy/now disabled children. Unfortunately, our dawning era of Big Tech censorship is making it harder to for those parents to share their evidence. People have to know someone to whom it happened, or have enough natural curiosity or skepticism to seek a bigger picture than what is officially acknowledged. I wholly believe vaccines are not the only cause of autism, but there is substantial real world evidence for anyone willing to look past the Narrative and its name-calling, that vaccines are *one* of the causes.

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Yes, research on vaccines has been intentionally limited. Don't think you can say the same thing about autism, just that the answers haven't been figured out yet. As to ignoring the reality/accounts of mothers, you miss the point. The temporality of symptoms is often separated from the damage, especially in brain injuries/changes. Bi-polar/Schizophrenia disorders usually appear in late teens and early 20s even though the damage/changes in the brain existed for a long time. ALS is usually diagnosed after age 40. So parents observations can be taken into consideration and be consistent with a theory of in-utero damage/changes. With the large increase in autism most folks would logically think it was multi-factorial of which vaccinations might be a small part of the issue. The rapidly increasing rate of autism over the last 25 years, when the vaccination protocol remained flat would indicate other issues are going on here. Not an expert by any means, but if the scientist are finding brain differences then there must be a direct casual link to implicate a vaccination only approach which has yet to be found. FYI, there are plenty of reasons to be skeptical in general of our current vaccination approach to public health. That doesn't necessarily equate vaccinations cause autism.

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RFK Jr. has been beating the drum of toxic environmental hazards for 40 years. He got pulled (really more like dragged or guilted) into taking up the vaccine safety issue 20 years ago because of his work on mercury exposures in the environment. So he would agree with you that vaccines are not likely the sole cause of the autism explosion. But EVERYTHING should be looked at, and when it comes to the link between neurotoxins in vaccines and autism, despite the loud protestations that it's been "thoroughly researched" and "debunked," the actual science—meaning, that which hasn't been funded or conducted by people with perverse incentives to find no connection—suggests real issues, and the loud claims about reams of evidence against the hypothesis don't hold up to scrutiny. For an eye-opening, clear explanation of that scrutiny, if you're interested, here's an outstanding presentation to the Arizona Senate regarding the science vs the claims.

https://thehighwire.com/ark-videos/aaron-siri-gives-testimony-on-the-floor-of-arizona-state-senate/

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I wish I could "like"your comment 1,000x. Exactly my issue , who is "funding" and the incentives are not good towards an unbiased approach

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Oh and thanks for the video........seen clips but not the whole video.

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I was only reacting to the post which stated that the science had found brain differences in autistic individuals that can be traced back to in-utero in some cases. Our son had his first vaccine at age 16. Before he was born I went into the college's medical library that I was working at and looked for the science. Found that after 1990 or so there was no work done identifying risk/benefit analysis nor any attempt to identify co-morbidities or any way to see different risk profiles. What I did find from the 1970s and 1980s were a couple of small exploratory studies indicating that a family history of reactive diseases (asthma, food allergies, lupus, etc.) might create a higher risk of vaccine reactions/injuries which my wife's large family had a lot of. Also found a single study that said redheads might also have a higher risk profile (My wife is a redhead and even though at the time I didn't know it turns out my child is too). I also noted that the day 1 Hep B vaccine was on the schedule and that seemed crazy to me. So my wife and I declined that day one vaccination. And then continue to refuse as I kept reading and thinking about it. (One of my concentrations in graduate school was sociology of medicine and knowing what I did know it was easy to be critical of that section of public health practice). So, bottom line, is according to this post, there is evidence that the damage that causes autism happens before vaccinations. So, if that evidence does exist, then some, if not most of the autism has causes that aren't vaccinations. And logic from this new science would suggest that autism causes are environmental and occur in the mothers body. Now it could be that vaccinating a pregnant women might be one of the causes? But, I agree that no science should be off limits and we should explore all possibilities. But, dogma, wether anti-vax or pro-vax should not lead, but science should. Again, no expert.

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I really appreciate you taking time to expand the context of your comment and views. The decision my husband and I made when we had our first, in 1992, were based on similar concerns to what you outlined (of the 7 risk factors then identified/recognized for adverse reactions, our baby girl had 4). So I'm in complete sympathy with your general stance, though I will say I lean towards skepticism regarding current autism research, as its conclusions too conveniently lend support to the orthodoxy. After 30 years of watching Pharma get away with capturing and corrupting our institutions of health and science, it has me too jaded to take such findings at face value. Not when the research into vaccine risks is so shady and/or lacking. As we already noted—the science that receives funding has everything to do with what gets defined as "known" vs. what is labeled as "debunked."

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Vaccination protocol has NOT remained flat over the last 25 years.

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Well my families reactions to the vaccine show otherwise. We just took my grandaughter to the ER with seizures. Her brother quit talking for 2 years after his vaccine injection. Big Pharma makes a lot of money $$&&&. I too fell the pro studies are biased and do not know why CDC continues to refuse to consider VAERS reports and the multitude of anecdotal reports. Why Bari Weiss and the authors & journalist she pick state unequivocally that the vaccine -autism connection is a myth and has been thoroughly disproved is beyond me. Sorry this author may insist it’s been proved otherwise (and it’s clear she believes that) but why is her opinion any better than my observations and experience in my family ? I’m trained in scientific method. Good grief. My extended family has a preponderance of autism in this current generation yet it is absent from previous generations. One sure constant are these childhood vaccines.

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I fucking love your response.

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My brother died of gliosarcoma about 3 years ago (a very rare brain tumor) and his neurosurgeon mentioned to him he had 3 other patients with this rare form of cancer and two of his associates had 2 each. I'm not a doctor or researcher but it's obvious to me there's something in our environment that's ubiquitous that's causing profound neurological damage. With the billions poured into medical research, why has no real advancement been made to uncover the culprits? Would it be bad for business if the researchers discovered popular products played a major role in this disaster?

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Very bad for business, in fact I’d imagine Big Pharma closing down any further discussion on this topic.

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Because i try not to make sweeping generalisations from anecdote, no matter how sad, I looked at life expectancy, which is rising

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While you disagree vehemently with RFK Jr re vaccines, you should agree that you cannot rule out vaccines as a contributing factor unless you study with an unvaccinated control group. That’s how science works.

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Exactly. Where is the data comparing vaxxed and unvaxxed kids? Having a control group is a definitive way to compare these two groups. As Kennedy rightly points out, what is also needed are longitudinal safety studies on childhood vaccines. There are zero, as he discovered after he sued the FDA to produce those studies which Fauci claimed existed.

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I have a control group of 4... my kids. Born 1075, 1982, 1991 and 1993. Never vaccinated and no childhood health issues. Another posted comment on Amish community. I'm sure vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups could be isolated to compare rates. It is not done because it will harm the profits of pharma that fund just about everything these days from doctors to hospitals to learning institutions to media to government. I sincerely hope RFK, Jr. gets traction in the Democratic race. There are other voices like his out there that are ignored at our own peril.

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So it doesn’t matter that millions of children get vaccinated and don’t have autism? Is this fact just irrelevant? Is it worth risking the lives and health of children, putting them at risk for polio etc in order to satisfy the desire for 100% certainty regarding vaccines? Medicine is always always about weighing risks against rewards. That becomes problematic of course when it comes to public health policy because then were in the realm of public school mandates etc. It’s easy to sit back and critique this or that policy or study but the reality is people on the front lines are having to make hard decisions based on what we know. Measles, mumps, and whooping cough are serious diseases too.

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None of what you are saying is the point. No one is disputing whether this or that disease or condition is a risk. The point is, we should have safety data as a matter of course for all medical interventions, especially shots given to children who have developing immune systems. We have no data on the effect of multiple vaccines on kids developing and future immune system. Don’t you want to know that? We’ve had ample time to study that and haven’t. The risk- benefit ratio should be crystal clear when taking any kind of intervention. That is currently NOT the case.

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I think what other commenters are advocating for is better, more nuanced studies. Of course, it does matter that millions of vaccinated children don’t have autism. But what is the percentage that do? What are other variables? If vaccines can be shown to be a contributor, how can they be improved? I am not seeing a callous, knee- jerk all vaccines are bad attitude, but instead a yearning for more information so we can continue to refine our knowledge and approaches.

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What would a good risk benefit ratio look like to you? Again, witness the millions and millions who are unaffected. You might find the link I provided to the table summarizing studies informative. There are in fact studies comparing the vaccinated and the vaccinated for incidence of autism.

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The affected. That’s what we should be looking at. The ratio of affected to unaffected too - that’s part of the safety data. I’ll look at your study but a cursory look and I see it’s on a government site and the NIH no less, the propagates of the Covid vaccine “safe and effective” stance. Back to the relevant issue. Where is the long term safety data? What are the side effects? Don’t you want to know that? Shouldn’t we all be demanding it if we are expected to inject our kids?Honestly, I find the disinterest in knowing these facts, to say the least, surprising.

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Let's assume for a moment that vaccines DO cause autism (if it is proven) and today one in approximately 40 children develop autism. If society believes that this is an acceptable tradeoff (and should include all the other potential "rare" adverse effects), then so be it. This should be part of informed consent.

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But also, not just autism. My son has chronic eczema developed as an infant. No family history...ever. There are other chronic side effects that would be good to know about. So while it may be 40 children that develop autism, it could be another 40 kids that develop another type of chronic disease. When I hear the side effects of "leaky bowels" on some of the pharma ads on tv, I can't imagine why anyone want to risk getting any of those side effects?!? But the point is, each family should weigh risks/benefits for themselves but do not feel like the choice is theirs with mandated vaccines.

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Well, it is time to attack the author and profess another area of our expertise. Today it's medicine. Tomorrow we put our war expert hats on, followed by sociology and who knows what else after that.

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Since each person's genetic/chemical/biological composition is different, vaccines will never be a one-size-fits-all panacea. Which is the reason SCOTUS ruled that vaccines are "unavoidably unsafe," the result of which was the vaccine injury compensation program.

As for the "serious" diseases you mention, it's important to understand rates of both cases and deaths were precipitously declining BEFORE the vaccines were even introduced. So again, not the panacea many people have been led to believe they are.

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Whoops, 1975, I don't have a century old child!

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Anyone questioning that is a serious pedant:)

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BTW: here are epidemiological studies showing that lack of a link between MMR and autism. Yes epidemiological studies are not double blind placebo studies but they are important and informative: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9464417/#:~:text=Comparison%20of%20the%20rate%20of,%2Dadjusted%20analyses%20%5B4%5D.

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Parents (and others) with concerns about autism and toxic exposures from vaccines are not solely focused on MMR, though that's what the medical industrial complex and their MSM mouthpieces would have you believe. So even though this may seem like a great refutation of the question, it's really not.

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