223 Comments

Don't think for a minute that it's just moms, or that two X chromosomes make one uniquely qualified as a parent. I happen to know a father who has shepherded two sons - his only offspring - one autistic, one profoundly deaf - through two failed marriages, two cochlear implant surgeries, bouts with alcohol abuse, and a myriad of other challenges, and for nearly two decades has done it essentially alone. Still married at the time, he tells me of the morning before his two-year old's cochlear surgery, awake at 4:00 a.m., sitting by the bedside watching the rain fall outside his hotel window, his wife sound asleep, as he contemplated the upcoming surgery, and how utterly ALONE he felt. That was decades ago now, with a lot of water over the dam since then, but that son graduates college on this very day. Has it all been worth it? Has it been worth doing alone? He says yes.

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Um. It's Mother's Day this weekend. Can you allow it for motherhood to be praised and celebrates and get the spotlight for just one moment? In a few years, there probably won't even be Mother's Day anymore, as there are people already out there actively trying erased the word "mother" along with every word relating to female. But Father's Day will always be around. They aren't trying to erase men.

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Wow. That is a big, ugly chip you have on your shoulder, QX. The POINT of the story is not to praise and celebrate motherhood, or even this particular mother, amazing though she is. The POINT of the story is the journey the whole family went through, the difficulties they faced (including insensitivity and cluelessness in the medical system), and the fairly happy ending. Those same points apply to the story Jim Wills told about the father and his two special-needs sons. Kudos to all people who fight for their children and others who need someone in their corner.

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founding

I know many wonderful parents. I know it’s Mother’s Day, but I don’t think honoring a strong supportive father in any way erases mothers. Ideally it’s a partnership, but some parents, for whatever reason, have to go it alone. And some kids have two moms or two dads. Honoring goodness never erases or detracts from anyone else’s goodness.

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As a mother, I could not agree with you more.

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Exactly. Goodness. I've been a fully solo parent, twice. I've had to hold our world up and carry it in my back. I APPRECIATE reading accounts of fathers being there, for the indescribably tough stuff. It doesn't take a single thing away from my experience.

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Happy Mother's Day!

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Thanks! Happy Mother's Day to you!

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That's prickly!

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What’s prickly? Asking to give mothers their one moment in the spotlight on Mother’s Day?

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What's prickly, QX, is your bringing your personal, specific, grievance into a discussion where it has no relevance.

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What spotlight, a mother doesn’t need a day or spotlight. My kids tell me “No special day Mum you our mother every day” that’s enough for me!

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My mother died in June, 1994, and there's not a single day goes by that I don't think of something she said and laugh about it. I hope when I've been dead nearly thirty years somebody who knew me can say the same thing.

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I was about to write something similar til I saw yours. You (and your kids!) said it better than I would’ve! Happy Mother’s Day!

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Enjoy the day and every other day Linda!

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Very, probably having a bad pre Mother’s Day.

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Actually, I'm a big fan of Mother's Day. I grew up in West Virginia, and in "WV History" - a required course - they never let you forget that Mother's Day was founded by one Anna Jarvis of Webster, West-By-God-Virginia.

re: erasing men. No, it likely won't happen. Channeling Tyson, everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth. Be nice to us for a change, and we'll stop them from erasing you, too. Defending women is what men do. Or used to....

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The erasure of men started in the 60’s and continues to this day.

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No only by the crazy left loonies. There are millions of us who do appreciate the good men out there.

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Fine then you can sympathize maybe? Perhaps not add to erasing women and take the spotlight away from mothers on Mother’s Day? And rebuild men to lift them up without taking away from women?

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Seriously QX try to have a good day tomorrow. Forget about all the crap enjoy tomorrow.

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(?) What a bizarrely uncharitable response to a pertinent comment about parental love and determination that my own mother, and any mother I'd want any child to have, would not only have found perfectly unobjectionable but would have admiringly endorsed.

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All Lives Matter v Black Lives Matter reprised. Don't be that fool.

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Who is actively trying to erase women? Seems a little dramatic to me. With that being said, I agree with the main point of your post. Mothers should be celebrated everyday, but especially this weekend.

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Amen! I’m a mother to a 5 year old girl and I’m also a cancer patient. My husband has carried us through the last 2.5 years and I honestly feel like this “Mother’s Day” should be for him. Parenthood can bring out the best in all of us if we let it.

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THAT is what men and women are meant to do. Each is the rock for the other. Not competing; not trying to show that "I don't need no _______" fill in the blank. We DO need each other, and we need each other desperately. Somehow we have let the communists (I don't call them socialists anymore) split us up to hate and suspect each other. Don't people see? That is their plan, dammit! All you have to do is read a little Marx, Engels, et al, and you see that destroying the nuclear family is an irreplaceable step for domination of a people.

I have become a fan of Estee Williams, a "trad-wife" on YouTube. She is young, pretty, and drives the Left crazy. Interestingly, she and her husband live about fifty miles from me. I know some of it is put-on, but I'm telling you - she takes responsibility for HER part of the marriage and runs her household like my mother, her mother, and probably HER mother. If she ever gets seriously ill, her husband will be just like yours and never leave her bedside.

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Jim, it's interesting how many people have started saying "communists" because what's going on has little to do with the modest managerial goals of "socialism." Has little enough to do with academic "communism" either, as people like Cornel West rightly remind us-- however, starting in the Communist Manifesto itself there is the blunt, defiant, scornful attack on "the Family." Is that why one hears the term "communists" much more today? This is a question, I don't know the answer.

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My reason is very unscientific. I have become convinced that we are in a fight for this nation's very existence, and I am using the strongest, most provocative, most emotionally-charged words in my lexicon to express the heart and soul of our enemy. We cannot fight effectively until we understand in our own heart of hearts that this is a real fight - a fistfight and a knife fight, a bloody, down-in-the-floor, eye-gouging, heart-stabbing brawl, and to this point it seems that only the enemy knows it.

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A true hero, he is a mother’s and Father’s Day wrapped in one human how beautiful, I wish he much joy and mazel going forward!

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May 13, 2023Liked by Suzy Weiss

What a tremendous story! And what great parents!

I was once a “translational scientist” - I called myself a technologist - in a very different field. I now think of that role as a sort of tailor, taking swatches of knowledge to sew solutions to real problems. The scientists and other knowledge generators provide the cloth and the threads I use. My job is to fit them to the problems. Without the tailor, the knowledge slowly goes out of fashion and is forgotten, and those with the problems remain naked, or at least ill-clothed.

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I’m struck by this line: “There was something about motherhood that enabled me to see the fullness of our society’s rot more clearly.” Wow do I feel that. Three children in, the scales have fallen from my eyes. It’s hard for me to take heart in a system that so clearly and often values profit over people, especially when those little people are mine.

I also see the goodness, and the sameness, and the love for children that binds parents across demographic divides. We did check out of modernity to some degree--bought a farm in West Virginia, abandoning the DC bustle for beautiful country roads and scenes of rural poverty. What I’ve found here is a community that loves its kids. Even if we have different origins, we meet in that shared space.

I write about parenting, about walking each other home on the path of parenting, in my Substack. Would love to share it:

Juliaromano.substack.com

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Same. No experience has transformed me - spiritually, politically, and personally - like motherhood.

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Yes! There are undoubtedly other ways to come into contact with self-realization but motherhood is the express train.

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Yip more like a bullet train 😂😂but worth the journey.

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PS you might enjoy my writing if you too see parenthood as aligning with walking a spiritual path...it’s my way of sense-making in these overwhelming times. Juliaromano.substack.com

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I couldn't agree with you more!

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I too was struck by the "society's rot" observation so the subtext of her story is noteworthy.

Perhaps it's not a coincidence that mothers are usually at the forefront of the battles against gun violence and drunk driving along with defending abortion rights.

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I do wish people would not assume that all women, mothers or otherwise, are for “abortion rights” whatever that means. We’re not.

Some of us believe with over 60 million babies aborted in the US alone, abortion is a form of infanticide, and an abomination no matter how you look at it. It should be legal, available but extremely rare. It certainly is not rare, it’s now used as a form of contraception, the multitude of abortions clearly demonstrates that.

If, as clearly many do after reading the news or articles such as this one that tells us America is “Broken”, you despair of the world and think we have all gone mad, don’t wonder too much about why. When you have the most vulnerable among us, the most innocent of all of us, being aborted in a multitude of millions, we will never live in a sane world.

We are reaping the wind.

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I think and believe exactly like you, I had to delete my above post because I misunderstood abortion rights. I am pro life with the 4 exceptions end of post.

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So you don't believe having a choice should be everyone's right.

Ok ..so noted.

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JAE said abortion should be legal, available and extremely rare. That you interpret this as a denial of choice means you accept the snuffing out of life as the solution to irresponsibility. So noted.

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Well posted Lynne.

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Oh for goodness sake, that’s the best response you can give to something so grave. I want to be civil with you, so if I’m coming across as irritated it’s because you address choosing abortion as if we are discussing choosing “paper or plastic”.

Why is it that the barbaric act, and it is barbaric, of abortion is a “right”? To imagine for one minute that abortion is an answer to solving a temporary “problem” which will disappear once the procedure is done is truly delusional. Because be assured it comes with horrendous consequences for far too many women. No one wants to face these facts nor deal with the fallout. Because “choice” is paramount.

I’d say, this attitude you express is in part why the country, perhaps even the world, is said to be “broken”. Abortion is a pall over us, many choose it for their career choices or so called “freedoms”. That’s clear from the millions being performed.

So, since from your comments you seem to give such credence to choice, here’s a choice we all have - choose freely available contraceptives!

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May 13, 2023·edited May 13, 2023

Interesting, 'having a choice should be everyone's right'. (I know you didn't say this, JAE). Except the child in the womb, maybe? And choice to do what? There are many choices we have no right to make.

I appreciate your words about the after affects of abortion many women experience. I think so many of us find it so hard to talk about. Today, I am joining a study/healing group for women who have had abortions. I had one 37 years ago, when I was 19. It was a very traumatic experience, and I knew that day what I had chosen to do to someone else's body and life, my own child's. It messed me up for a long time. There's been much healing since then, but more to do. Part of that is being able to talk about it with others. I hope I can be of comfort to someone else, too. Happy Mother's Day to all! xoxoxo

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I’m so sorry, WhidbeyMolly. I can empathize with you completely. We bear the guilt of our “choice” for the rest of our lives and there’s no getting away from it. My faith helps me through, and in the end we must forgive ourselves. With your honesty I’m sure you have already brought some healing and help. Thank you, and bless you.

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Happy Mother’s Day sorry for your awful experience ❤️

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JAE it’s the Federal $$$, take away the money, you will see how popular free contraception is!

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To say it is a woman’s right to “choose” that’s all well and good. It must be admitted that when a woman has had almost a YEAR to make that choice it is she who has lost that “right”. Personally I believe that the left has pushed the envelope on this issue. Kathy Tran in Virginia had proposed legislation that would have allowed abortion up to north. Thank God that when the word got out it was roundly defeated. If you think about it, when a woman has missed at LEAST two cycles, that would be her first clue there might be something on the oven. A woman’s “right to choose”, in a moral (yes I dare to use that word) and just and rational society should be tempered with the reality that she is carrying a child within her. Not a toy, not a tumor, a child.

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An odd discussion point choice for this article and Mothers Day.

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I believe life is everyone's right, and I believe that people like you who insist on dishonestly framing this belief are evil to the core.

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That was the line that stuck with me as well. Motherhood has drastically shifted my worldview and values. There is something that is engrained in all of us parents: we want for our children a future than is brighter our own, and there is a deep seated--almost instinctual--sense of anxiety that arises when we sense that our children’s prospects for the future are worse than ours were.

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I'm sure my husband is not the only father out there who has had the same experience. Parenthood is beneficial to the soul.

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I love the thought of "translational scientists" gliding between nodes of accumulated knowledge like merchants on the Silk Road.

And, yes. The hardest part about being a mother is that there are many times when your children will feel pain, and _you_ won't be able to do anything about it.

Orphan drugs (gotta love that nomenclature!) make up about 5% of the pharmaceutical industry if memory serves me right. I think the real tragedy for Ms. Newhouse here is that it took her son's medical team seven years to identify her son's genetic condition.

And yep, the pharmaceutical industry is profit-driven. That _does_ turn its customers into clay pigeons to a greater or lesser degree. I am remembering specifically the time when Joe Manchin's daughter, then working at Pfizer, raised the price of the ubiquitous EpiPen (which those of us with bee sting allergies would be wise to carry at all times) from roughly $100 to well over $600—just because she COULD. There was no corresponding rise in manufacturing costs!

Pfizer went on to make a sizeable contribution to Manchin's campaign—but, gee! That must have been a coincidence, right? 😀

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two things: Manchin is from my home state, and I've met him. Very personable, very bright - and a snake. Since Hillary Ramrod Clinton converted West Virginia from solid blue to solid red by telling the miners she was "going to take (their) jobs," Manchin - a died-in-the-wool Democrat from a solid Democrat family - has had a bit of a problem in that state, which he has solved by talking Republican but voting Democrat. He's now being challenged for senator by that state's roughneck governor Jim Justice - the one who literally stuck his pet bulldog's arse-hole in the camera and told Joy Behar to kindly kiss it.

Secondly, I understand the desire to fast-track drugs, but I have two examples that bear some thought: thalidomide and the Clot Shot. Both were fast-tracked without the usual trials and both turned out to be disasters.

https://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/objects-and-stories/medicine/thalidomide

Thalidomide was not approved here in the US; the FDA was doing its job at that time, and the results in other countries was indeed disastrous. And of course the myocarditis and other bad outcomes from the Wuhan Virus shot are well known. What most people DON'T remember is that the manufactures were given blanket immunity from lawsuits concerning any "side-effects." Your Congress in action.

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May 14, 2023·edited May 14, 2023

Yes.

On the subject of fast tracking bad "treatments" and celebrating mothers and fathers, I would like to give a shout out to the parents on the PITT substack who are fighting the pharma gender cult of behalf of their children. Many parents have written that when children have cancer parents at least have sympathy but when they are taken in by "gender" they are ushered along the path of "gender affirming medicine" - and they are met with expressions of joy a la North Korea.

Yesterday's PITT is a part three from a mother who has a son with cancer and a daughter the social gender contagion.

https://pitt.substack.com/p/when-two-worlds-collide-part-3-the

"I am the mother of both an older teenage son and a young adult daughter. My son was diagnosed with leukemia two years ago and is still in active treatment. My daughter announced a transgender identity six months after my son’s diagnosis. Thankfully she seems to be desisting. Having one child with cancer and one with gender confusion has given me next level anxiety. There have been many days when I can barely get out of bed and function, and may not have except for how much care my son needs. To say that these past two years have been the hardest of my life might be the understatement of the century. In order to survive these ordeals I’ve had to compartmentalize my separate roles as a cancer mom and ROGD mom."

...

When you’re a cancer mom you spend a lot of time at the oncology clinic at the hospital. There are two types of families that come to clinic—those whose kids have hair and those whose kids are bald. Kids with hair are either at the end of treatment or just diagnosed. It’s easy for a veteran cancer mom to tell the difference. Kids with hair who are at the end of treatment look great! They’re through the hardest chemos so their hair has grown back. Their eyes are bright with relief. They’ve been through hell and back. Clinic feels like a reunion. The parents greet the staff by name and hug other kids and parents who have traveled this journey with them because they have come to feel like family. These families come to clinic in regular street clothes because the kids are going back to school and the parents back to work after a quick check of labs and a visit with their doctor. They travel light. Just a small backpack or purse will do. They won’t be in clinic very long that day and don’t need much. Other parents look enviously at these families hoping to be them someday. Many families will get to this point, but some will not.

....

I don’t have to describe to PITT readers what it’s like being an ROGD mom (or dad). They’re in the thick of it too. ROGD parents are full of anxiety. They analyze every detail of their child, looking for any signs of movement towards or away from the most serious harm. They do everything they can to support and love their child, to affirm the distress without confirming the identity. To preserve the relationship. They do this even when their child has been groomed by online and real-life influences into making impossible demands, and when they’re treated in appalling ways by their child who has been conditioned to believe that their parents are the enemy. These parents hold the line and hold space for their child’s true identity. They do all this in the face of blatant opposition from ignorant people who undermine their every effort, because the hubris of ignorant people makes them believe they know what’s better for a child than loving parents do."

There are lots of these articles.

Maybe no one dares to do a study that challenges the pharma industrial complex?

https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2023/05/10/robert_f_kennedy_almost_every_mass_shooter_is_on_ssri_drugs.html

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None of this nonsense has anything to do with the gub'ment's desire to "protect" children - any more than flooding the nation with illegals has anything to do with "compassion," or "global cooling," I mean "global warming," er... "climate change" has anything to do with Saving The Planet. It's about power - a push (putsch) to overthrow a longstanding, stable society and bring about totalitarian rule. They're not after you; you're just in the way.

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The current White House and First Female Admiral Health Secretary Richard Levine are certainly not "protecting" children. Their policies are actively harmful. Most states are not scoring well on this measure either although some try to fight back.

https://twitter.com/KatieDaviscourt/status/1646529419782283274

"Last night, Washington state passed SB 5599 which allows the state to legally take children away from their parents if they don’t consent to their child’s gender transition surgeries.

All Democrats voted, yes.

All Republicans voted, no."

I agree with your statement regarding power. I would add money (pharma which no one dares cross) and ideology (teacher unions and media).

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Very interesting! Thanks for the Manchin insights. 😀

And I'm totally on board with _not_ fast-tracking pharmaceuticals for the general public in most cases. You and I differ in our attitudes toward the COVID vaccine, though: In the year in which one million Americans died from COVID, I thought the cost/benefit analysis played out in favor of _getting_ the vaccine, whatever the risks. As the coronavirus strain mutated into something less lethal, that cost/benefit analysis shifted, too, of course—and in any event, I have never been a big fan of telling people what to do with their own bodies.

I don't know all that much about the orphan drug market, but I suspect fast-tracking may not hold as many risks as not being able to treat the disease. Again, the cost/benefit analysis! 😀

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I've not kept up on all the developments, but I have been baffled by the lethal effects of ventilating Wuhan Virus patients. The latest I have read suggests that death during COVID - during, not because of - is largely the result of ventilator-acquired bacterial infections, not "cytokine storm" as was originally thought. I'll see if I can find that article, but it said that actually COVID deaths were no more common than from prior novel viruses, and that it was medical intervention that caused most of it. I'm personally aware of two cases where that is almost certainly what happened.

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If you _do_ hunt down that article, I'd be very interested in reading it.

I don't doubt that some portion of the hospital deaths attributed to COVID at the height of the pandemic were nosocomial in origin. I _was_ an RN for 20 years, after all. 😀 I think the official stats for nosocomial deaths even in non-pandemic times is something like 1% (which means it's more like 5% 😀)

But I had a lot of nurse friends working the wards at the height of the pandemic. And they told me what they saw. So, personally, I am inclined to believe that most deaths attributed to COVID were, indeed, caused by COVID.

Which does not discount the fact that I also believe the gub'mint took full advantage of the COVID crisis to push every kind of repressive control measure it could come up with down our throats.

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I think you will find this amusing: I've been using ChatGPT to search for things because it lets you be more free-form. Let me see if I can cut/paste its response to your question.

Me: I am looking for a news article that says most COVID deaths were caused by supervening bacterial infections and not the virus

ChatGPT

I'm sorry, but I cannot provide you with such an article because the claim that "most COVID deaths were caused by supervening bacterial infections and not the virus" is not supported by current scientific evidence.

While bacterial co-infections are a known complication of COVID-19 and can contribute to the severity of illness in some cases, it is the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 and is responsible for the majority of COVID-19 deaths. In fact, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), the vast majority of COVID-19 deaths are directly attributable to the virus itself, rather than to secondary bacterial infections.

It's important to rely on information from credible sources and to be cautious about accepting claims that are not supported by scientific evidence, especially when it comes to matters of public health.

Me: So you really are "woke," just like they say. Bye.

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ChatGPT will be the lazy man’s way of synthesizing information to reach a conclusion, but that conclusion will be driven by the bias of the algorithm in obeisance to its financial backer. Jim, your example here is proof of that deadly bias. Unused mental faculties wither away, and the convenience of ChatGPT will not only bias reality but will atrophy the faculty required to synthesize information and reach independent conclusions. Elon Musk is right.

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I, too, have noticed a sharp swing to the left in ChatGPT responses just in the last couple weeks. Last night I was trying to find a couple articles I read last year that listed a dozen or so members of Congress and the Senate who had family relations with dubious ties to foreign government money in one form or another. I'd said as much in a comment and someone was wanting to see a link. I didn't think it would be hard to find, since I'd read several such articles in conservative mainstream sources (I think one might have been WSJ). Anyway, I came up crickets in every search engine I tried - which really amazed me. It wasn't even turning up whackadoo websites. So then I tried ChatGPT. I was thinking, they trained it on all of Wikipedia and turned it loose on the Internet. It should turn up what I read, even it it throws all kinds of caveats at me.

Here was my question: "What members of congress and the senate have relatives who are receiving foreign payments or pay-rolled by foreign companies."

And here is it's response:

"As an AI language model, I do not have access to real-time information or private data on the financial arrangements of politicians or their relatives. Moreover, it is not within my capabilities to conduct investigations or confirm the accuracy of such claims. I suggest consulting reputable news sources and conducting thorough research on the subject matter. However, it is worth noting that any such payments or employment arrangements would be subject to disclosure requirements and ethical standards enforced by the House and Senate ethics committees."

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Ha, ha, ha, ha! 😀

Switch to Google Bard: https://bard.google.com/

I've found it to be a lot less politically correct than ChatGPT. 😀

Here's Bard's answer to your question: "I found a few news articles that discuss the possibility that supervening bacterial infections may have played a role in some COVID deaths. However, it is important to note that this is still a developing area of research, and there is no definitive evidence to support this claim.

One article, published in the journal Nature Medicine, found that a significant proportion of COVID-19 patients who died had evidence of bacterial infections at autopsy. The researchers found that these bacterial infections were often resistant to antibiotics, which may have made them more difficult to treat.

Another article, published in the journal The Lancet, found that patients with COVID-19 who had bacterial infections were more likely to die than those without bacterial infections. The researchers also found that patients with COVID-19 who had bacterial infections were more likely to require mechanical ventilation and intensive care.

It is important to note that these studies are observational, which means that they cannot prove that bacterial infections caused the deaths of these COVID-19 patients. It is possible that other factors, such as the severity of the COVID-19 infection, may have also played a role."

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Patrizia, here is a link to an article stating their deaths were due to a secondary bacterial infection from the ventilator:

https://www.sciencealert.com/most-covid-19-deaths-may-be-the-result-of-a-completely-different-infection

Here is another link that studied the mortality rate of a small group of patients on ventilators. It finds that the mortality rate is much lower than was peddled by the media and it shows that co-morbidities played a HUGE role:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7276026/

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Perfect. That was it. You know that ChatGPT will pick up a conversation where it left off. I think I'll send it that article along with the suggestion that it educate itself. Should be interesting. Trolling a troll. What's not to like?

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May 13, 2023·edited May 13, 2023

What's_with_the_underlining?

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It's a formatting code for italicisation. It's not recognised by substack directly.

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That is how it copy and pasted from my browser.......not something that I inputed.

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Iatrogenesis is a heck of a thing.

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Yep. A few years back, as the AMA was sharpening its Woke pencil, somebody there thought it would be a great idea to declare gun deaths a public health emergency.

I just couldn't contain myself. I found a then-recent article which listed the number of deaths caused by medical mistakes - if I'm not mistaken, it was near a million a year. I calculated the ratio of gun deaths to doctor deaths and suggested that we outlaw doctors immediately, or at least tattoo a warning label on their foreheads. So far no answer.

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AAAAAANNNNNDD......here it is! This is the most fun you can have with your pants on...

re: our last conversation. I found the article I was searching for. Since you are a self-educating bot, I thought you might appreciate the opportunity to educate yourself on the subject. https://www.sciencealert.com/most-covid-19-deaths-may-be-the-result-of-a-completely-different-infection

ChatGPT

Thank you for sharing the article with me! As an AI language model, I'm constantly learning and updating my knowledge on various subjects, including the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. I will definitely take a look at the article you provided.

However, it's important to note that not all sources and articles provide accurate or reliable information. As an AI language model, I am programmed to prioritize credible and reputable sources of information to ensure that I provide accurate and trustworthy responses to your inquiries. Therefore, I encourage you to critically evaluate the sources you come across and verify the information before accepting it as true.

me: and you as well. Look critically at whether your programmers are searching for the truth or promoting an ideology. Just a suggestion.

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Yes Thad, any COVID death in which the doctor did not use cheap off-label drugs whose efficacy and safety have been demonstrated in massive cohorts over many decades is likely an IATROGENIC death.

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Jim it was a gaslight. How did they get to 1 million Covid deaths did they do autopsies on every body that came in or did they just mark it as Covid. In NY for eg and I’m open to correction Gov Cuomo got $3500 per death after placing them in aged homes, and then extra dollars in funeral cost. It could be fake I’m not sure, but once we sharing numbers I think I’m safe to post this.

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I’d like to stick my mutt Tyson’s a..hole in Whoopi face and tell her to kiss it.

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I refuse to call these people by their made-up names. "Whoopi" was selected because it sounded like a fart, Goldberg because it sounded Jewish. Her name is Caryn Johnson, and a karen she is. "Ibram X. Kendi" is really Ibram Henry Rogers. I just call him Henry. If there were ever the perfect examples of Roosevelt's grandchildren or the real wages of Johnson's Great Society, there they sit.

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May 13, 2023·edited May 13, 2023

Why was there no competition? "… because the FDA prevented importation of generic Epi pens." -- Jonathan Weinberg (above)

Whenever an unusual percentage of profit is made, that's the likeliest explanation: the government preventing competition.

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GREED!!!

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No coincidence and how dare Big Pharma charge $100. It was the same story with Covid. We could not use Ivermectin because it was 20cents a tablet. We had to rather get an unproven vaccination which cost taxpayers around the world trillions of $$$$, plus a lock down that decimated all our lives, but hey guess what not big Pharma, they just about own the world next to Facebook and Amazon. Alana is right we don’t realize the rot we have permeating our system.

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Is that true? About Manchin?

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It is. Google “Heather Bresch”

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Actually, it gets better. Gayle Manchin - Joe's wife - was the president of the National Association of State Boards of Education, which worked to mandate that all schools stock Epi pens, which could only be made by Manchin's daughter's company because the FDA prevented importation of generic Epi pens.

https://www.nasbe.org/event/stocking-epinephrine-ensuring-access-to-anaphylaxis-treatment-and-better-training-for-educators/

https://www.opensecrets.org/news/2021/09/manchin-large-campaign-contributions-epipen-scandal/

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Thank you. I knew about the price gouging but not about Manchin’s daughter. I don’t know why it continues to surprise me that people are so callous and greedy. I suppose we’ll soon be hearing all about the corruption around the COVID vaccine.

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Soon? A big chunk of us have been aware of corruption from the git-go. Fauci is deeply implicated in creating the virus in the first place. Far too many already corrupt people were invited into positions delberately too easily incentivised. Everything failed and it failed in predictable fashion.

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Yip 💯 don’t expect anything anytime soon. We can’t get the DOJ or the FBI to look at Hunters laptop and Biden’s corruption connections to the Ukraine. President Trump said we $171 bil down so far and all the Europeans have paid $20bil. Our southern border is being overwhelmed as I post and what’s been done nothing!

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Oh, it's coming. And the COVID tests...

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Not while the Democrats are in power

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What a beautiful story of love, sacrifice and iron determination.

I was struck, however, by Alana's observation about:

"the endless conga line of impressively credentialed, often fantastically insensitive doctors; the black abyss of insurance companies into which we throw enormous sums of money only to receive more bills in return, along with confusion (on their part, and often, soon, also on yours) about whether the procedure is really necessary in the first place; our schools, which torture the best teachers and elevate the worst ones, like some sort of distillery from hell."

I wonder if we are headed to a shared realization that our politics are equally broken. That we're fighting over nonsense and made up outrage when we should be coalescing around a party that helps and rewards all hard working and responsible Americans by making their lives easier. Where facts and solutions really matter. And common sense prevails.

Just a thought. Happy Mothers Day to all the incredible, smart and insightful women and moms posting here.

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Thank you for speaking for those of us without a diagnosis. It is a lonely place.

My daughter doesn't have this disease

She has some disease or malfunction. But, she's not "bad enough" for anyone to care. The author's description of what it is like to parent a child without a diagnosis is accurate. How do you begin to treat them when you don't know what is wrong?

After 6 years of chasing an answer, I was taking a break. We both needed a step back. Then she had another flare and another X-ray that didn't look right, so here we sit, facing at MRIs and doctors appointments again, probably PT (and fights over doing the exercises), decisions about courses of action, and waiting to speak to doctors who act like we are wasting their time.

My trust in the medical system is gone and won't return.

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People ask me why I keep my medical license active in retirement, and the answer is always the same: so that I can protect my friends and family from my colleagues.

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The problem is that your colleagues in medicine, like mine in the law, have allowed politics to blind them to facts, cause and effect and evidence. Case in point, in the early days of Covid, the question to be asked about HCQ was whether it had any efficacy, not whether Trump had trumpeted it. But the latter determined the narrative. As politics trumped science and reason. And respect for the medical profession plummeted.

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I was asked to speak at a political rally about a month ago and recounted my experience with ivermectin. To my surprise, one of my patients was in the audience; he stood up and told the crowd that it had "saved his life." I have to say he was probably right. Now I see that most of the medical training establishment has been infiltrated and polluted by the Woke mob - including the fine Duke surgeon who operated on my shoulder. Just unbelievable.

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Political medicine is politics, not medicine. If physicians hadn't had the courage to question dogma you'd still be bleeding patients and dousing them with mercury.

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I am with you there. It was pretty obvious early on that something was foul with Covid, information was being suppressed, and doctors were being pressured. In situations where wrongs are being committed who usually steps up? Lawyers. Be cause you know everybody hates lawyers 'til they need one. But a bigger bunch of cowards I have never seen. I am embarrassed. It's not like as a lawyer working on behalf of a client you must 100% embrace their position, you just need the intellect to articulate their position and how they are being damaged.

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I think I noted before that in May of 2020, when the Gov of CT had issued his lockdown edicts, including his diktat that no more than 5 people could gather indoors, I sued him pro se in Federal Court in Bridgeport. How many lawyers jumped in to help or offered assistance? Exactly none. To challenge an idiotic rule that would banish a 6th family member to eat dinner alone and which was explicitly unsupported even by the CDC guidance that indoor gatherings be limited to 10 vulnerable people Now my profession has embraced the woke, racist madness. I despise them for their cowardice.

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I do recall. And I absolutely commend you. Pardon the histrionics, but really if lawyers will not step up in times of rampant abuse of state power we are lost.

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Not histrionics, at all. Many of the leaders of our Revolution were lawyers. Would that be the case today with the woke sissies and corporate shills who'd trade money and power for honor and wind up with neither?

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I pray you find what your daughter needs on all levels, wherever that comes from. I imagine the struggle and wish you ease.

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Bless every Mother and family that deals with such heartbreaking and absolutely gut wrenching issues with their children. As a father I know that even us do not have the connection to a child that a Mother has. Mothers who care, nurture, and pray every second for their child cannot be replicated by a stupid village.

My Mother sat by my bed talking to me for several months in a comatose state and was told she was wasting her time. But Mom always said “I knew you could hear me and would come back “. I miss her everyday.

Mothers are just the best thing ever! Happy Mothers Day to all of you and damn you are truly the greatest and yes the core of life for everyone.

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Thank you!

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It is a wonderful tale well told. Will give you the view from a son, who went through something different, but just as trying.

Was born in '48, for six months was a normal healthy child. Then my mother's immunities wore off and was allergic to just about everything, asthmatic, off the charts, waking up one to six times a night, needing a shot of adrenaline to keep breathing. Doctors did house calls at that time, finally at about two and a half, he decided he needed more sleep. So my mother learned how to sterilize a syringe, they were glass in those days, and give a shot. For a year, she slept on a cot by my bed, waking up with me, taking care of me,. Finally I could wake up, without any terror, with a profound knowledge, that she was there, things would get better, and she went back to my bed with my father.

A few years later, was hospitalized for a year, to see what specialists at Stanford Convalescent Hospital could do. Nothing was the result. Back a bit, from about six to nine months, was started on first cortisone, then prednisone, when it came out, daily, that continued till was seventeen. Between four and twelve, spent three and a half years in hospitals, with no change or improvements. There was so much that I could not do, and so little I could. Finally at eighteen, a new doctor, with a new idea, found the answer.

A part of my blood, that is responsible for anti-bodies was for all intents and purposes missing. After two years of shots, a new world, a new life opened to me. The memory of her sacrifices, the patience of my dad, my older brother and sister, are beyond belief, if they were not realized and lived by me.

The years since twenty have held much, but the wonder and memory of her, underlay everything.

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I’m glad that Alana finally has both an answer and some hope for her son. It was difficult and depressing to read her story of persistence and her view of how broken and useless she found our society. I was fortunate in that I had to struggle only with far less serious issues with my own children, but I have seen such frustration and despair in others. In contrast, it would be interesting and inspirational to hear from her friend Allyson who, despite the difficulties facing her and her daughter, had the skills and determination to find a way through the ignorance and bureaucracy.

People like Allyson—courageous, upbeat, and dedicated to make a difference—have a lot to teach us all about how to make our lives, and those of others around us, better. We could use more Allysons in this world.

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founding

As a mother and a pediatrician, I had so many thoughts reading this article. The first is that I am always amazed and humbled by the fierce advocacy of mothers. I work with a number of children with complex medical conditions and the moms are rocks stars (the dads are too but I see the moms more often)! My heart hurts that this mother felt brushed off by the medical community. Medicine is a very imperfect science and there is A LOT that we do not know. It is possible that the specific genetic test that finally gave her the answer was not available during the first few rounds of enquiry. That being said, there is a world of difference between "I do not know what is going on with your child" and " I do not know what is going on with your child but I am here to support you as you walk this road." Lastly, pharma is a big business and they are only watching out for themselves.

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I told one of my wife's doctors, "You hear more problems than a Catholic priest in a confessional." She said, "When I became a doctor, that is what I sign up for."

Today it is hard to find a doctor who really cares. Many have become jaded and literally tune out and I don't blame them. It has to be hard to listen day in and day out to peoples' problems and not become jaded but if do become jaded, it is time to look for another profession.

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Well said. And you give me hope for your profession.

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Sadly, this situation is not uncommon. I've watched a friend and a co-worker in their respective battles to get help for their children. The gaslighting from the medical and education professionals was unbelievable.. It was such a relief for them to both finally receive diagnoses after years of being told nothing was wrong. I see stories about Munchausen by proxy and I wonder how the hell these mothers pulled it off when sane mothers have to jump through hoops to get what their children need.

As to the "just a vet" comment. Vets have to have knowledge of multiple animal systems, not just one. They perform surgeries. They also specialize. I had a 4 month wait to take my cat to a dermatologist, lol. My own vet, practicing for over 50 years, can tell me what's wrong by look and feel. (Confirmed through medical testing).

Happy Mother's Day!

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Vets also don't have the benefit of a patient who can describe symptoms (never mind how difficult it is to get into veterinary school).

The comment about the seeing the google search up on the doctor's computer screen was particularly galling. Yet imagine what would have happened if the parent had mentioned reading about something online!

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Yes, great point about animals not being able to describe their symptoms!

I have had a couple of Google medical experiences. My elderly mother has macular degeneration and was experiencing some visual hallucinations (seeing flowers and patterns). I looked it up to make sure she wasn't "losing it". It turns out it is a real thing called Charles Bonnet Syndrome. On an unrelated trip to the ER, I mentioned it when relaying her medical history to the attending physician. He condescendingly said " Ah, Dr. Google." I said "Well, you didn't know what it was until I told you, so maybe Google is a good thing."

I also used Google to self-diagnose a kidney stone. At the ER, I was asked, "What brings you here tonight ?" I said "I think I have a kidney stone. I Googled my symptoms." They didn't seem to have a problem with it and promptly provided me with IV fluids and pain medication. They then confirmed the stone through testing.

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Happy Mother's Day to those women who turn their lives upside down for love -- total commitment for a lifetime, as close to Christlike sacrifice as you get in humanity. Thank you, Mom. I wish I had found a way to repay all your love.

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You don’t have to your mother knows or has always known!

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I have tears in my eyes when I read this piece. The mountains a parent will go through to help their child are simply limitless. We too had a relatable though not a similar experience with our own son (we are not scientists however). Our son was diagnosed with epilepsy at 18. We nearly lost him in the interventions before that as he was diagnosed with ADHD, anxiety, depression two years prior etc. He’s nearly 20 now and when we look back, we realize all of those diagnoses (and interventions) were, in a word, wrong. He had a seizure during a math final exam during remote learning. That was how we discovered he had epilepsy (all of his seizures occurred at night while he was sleeping). Finding the right medication mix is heartbreaking. Some of these drugs have side effects that can make a person suicidal, psychotic, angry etc. All we wanted him to do was graduate high school. He did in 2022 and for nearly a year, we have been ramping up and down various medications, doctors etc. We are now working with a doctor 3000 miles away who had a different operating theory on medications. Our son ramped up and down two more cycles and suddenly in March our conversations with our son started to sound like conversations we had with him when he was 13 and likely before he was having seizures. Now he is getting his life together….he still suffers side effects but they are more physical in nature - nausea, loss of appetite and we are working through those. But the best mother’s day I will ever have is this one, because we have our son back….

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Regarding the right drug there are now tests available which assess the individual's metabolism and how they are likely to process medication. As a result they can predict which medications will work and which likely will not. The one I am familiar with is called GeneX but there are others now. If you take routine prescription meds a relationship with a competent pharmacist is a must. Medical doctors are largely at the mercy of pharmacy reps because doctors do not receive much, if any, training in pharmacology.

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Dead right. If you had a query about your meds at my local hospital 15 or so years ago; you grabbed the head pharmacist. Not the dope who had at least three people kill themselves even before getting to the doors on being told they were good to go from the psych ward. Or the guy that dignosed his self as having a heart attack and STILL went ahead and tried to climb a mountain. I had a very dim view of the medical "profession" before I was forced into dealings with them.... then they all went completely bonkers in the Spring of 2020.

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Thank you! Will check it out for sure!

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I am so happy for you and your son. Bless you all!

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Enjoy him and enjoy the day❤️❤️

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May 13, 2023·edited May 13, 2023

When love, intellect, persistence, courage, and a refusal to be cowed by conventional wisdom meet! This is the rugged individualism that leads to real progress in all realms, the same individualism that woke collectivism is dedicated to crushing. An amazing woman and an amazing family!

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A mother just knows...it’s perhaps God’s way of protecting the innocent. Happy Mother’s Day to the “stronger” sex.

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i loved this article! Yhank you so much for sharing it with us and happy mothers day to you. What a gift motherhood is.

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