428 Comments

The author has some very 'progressive' ideas for solving the weight 'crisis'. Tax foods. Have the government track people's weight. Encourage people to report on each other. I'd rather live in a society that is free and fat.

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I have been a sub scriber to the Free Press, but lately I have not been receiving it. Can you tell me why??

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OMG…. BIGGEST TAKEAWAY… “My friend told me about this injectable drug and asked me if I wanted some. I took it right then.”. Ummmmm… REALLY?!? Something injected and given through prescription, Bari just takes? It’s like a $3,000/dose prescription. CLEARLY- Bari and I live in very different worlds.

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One of RFK Jr’s policies is to prioritize healthy foods, regenerative farming and focus on childhood obesity and chronic disease. And eliminate big pharma’s ability to advertise directly to consumers. This would make a huge difference. It’s not a shocker that that media is against him because that would significantly reduce advertising income and eliminate big pharma’s power over the press. For example the NYT has done a half a dozen stories about the benefits of Ozempic. (And of course so militant regarding covid vax) It shocks me that The Free Press doesn’t seem to support him.

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I thought this would have more information about the side effects and the cause of the underlying issues. Why do obese people consume inordinate amounts of food? Why can't they do what they know will help, which is to eat healthy foods, and ignore processed foods?

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Does Ozempic do anything to cause weight loss other than deaden appetite?

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I've been pudge most of my life. I'm also short, so it's accentuated. I KNOW that not eating at night and exercising makes me feel better and I lose weight every time. But I fight it and not sure why. I have never been morbidly obese(although the weight charts at the doc's office have classified me that way on occasion at 175lbs).

The bottom line is there is no easy way when you continue living a certain lifestyle. Being sedentary makes me hungry....which it shouldn't. Working out suppresses my appetite.

I'll be 60 in a couple of days. I try to work out every day before work and on the weekend, I am busy riding horses, fixing cattle fences, etc.

I'm a vet so I have medical understanding of these things.....all the weight loss drugs are tradeoffs. Most weight issues boil down to psychology of overeating....and no one wants to touch that with a 10ft pole.

Food, and I am guilty of this, has become a comfort drug to millions of people. I get immense joy out of a fresh baked cookie....it's not nourishment for Americans...it's entertainment and that's dangerous.

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So the Dalai Lama "fat-shamed" Johann after Johann accused him of "homophobia"? Good on the Dalai Lama.

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While the Metabo Law sounds horrific to me, I can only applaud the Japanese approach to food. My brother and sister-in-law never had candy or sweets available to their children when they were growing up. As toddlers, my nieces' favorite foods were cherry tomatoes and fresh mushrooms.

As for Ozempic, there may not be a consensus yet on what the drug does to one's brain or thyroid, but there is a growing consensus that weight loss due to Ozempic reflects just that: weight. Not fat mass, just weight. At least 50% of the weight lost comes from muscle. That bodes ill for keeping the fat off.

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This article ignores all of the most recent research around GLP-1 medications. For example, recent research confirms reduction in heart disease for patients taking Ozempic/Wegovy. Mounjaro/Zepbound has been found to reduce sleep apnea. It ignores ALL the research on health benefits derives from significant weight reduction. Finally, it ignores the most recent research showing no risk of an increase in thyroid cancer. By focusing only on Ozempic, and by implication, diabetes, you are ignoring that these medications are, in fact, FDA approved for the treatment of obesity. Please be fair in cover this issue.

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This man talks like he has all of the answers to life which he does not. There is a large genetic component to obesity, which as far as I can see, is not there in the skinny obsessed Japan. It's really easy to be skinny when your parents are/were skinny.

Processed foods are not the villains that this person thinks they are. Other than preventing starvation, they are useless., along with their evil twin GMO which had the misfortune of increasing yields and driving down prices to also forestall starvation.

To anoint this man as an expert is wrong and foolish. Anecdotal evidence is what is it-anecdotal evidence.

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One of the things I wish this interview had addressed was the short-term side effects, like saggy flesh and "Ozempic face" and also reports that you are constantly on the toilet and having "accidents," even while sleeping. Yeah no thanks, I think I'll pass and just use more self-control.

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"I went to this company in Tokyo. You arrive at the company; it scans your face and says, “Hi, Bari, you walked 13,000 steps yesterday. You are 112th in the company’s ranking.” It might also say, “By the way, Suzy, who works at the desk next to you, hasn’t weighed herself in the last two weeks. Could you remind her?” "

You've got to be joking. Whatever happened to a balanced diet and exercise? Do we have to go from obese to Nazi?

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On the question of former Wegovy patients putting the weight back on after ceasing their weekly injections, Dr. Michael Miedema, MD, MPH of the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation has looked at all the trial data, and uses the drugs in his clinical practice at Allina Health, the best health system in our market, in my experience.

Avoid the N=1 approach to making a difficult decision. In his clinical practice, he says that the split between patients who regain the weight and those who keep it off is about fifty-fifty. Another doctor's practice could show 100% regaining weight. It's just a sampling issue.

He also makes it clear that while these drugs are effective for a variety of patients, the best, largest population, longitudinal study on factors which help cardiovascular health and contribute to a better quality of life is The Framingham Study, which is widely available in many different forms. Framingham says, among other things, that a healthy diet (something akin to the Mediterranean diet) and moderate activity are among the best tools in keeping off the weight losses. We are in charge of our lifestyles and we have all the tools to manage our health and quality of life. Wegovy is a tool in the arsenal for many, but it is not a magic potion.

I highly recommend Dr. Miedema's presentation which is on the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation's You Tube Channel. Be forewarned: he speaks very rapidly. Have a recording device nearby, or if like me, you are good with a kinds of shorthand, keep a pad and pencil nearby. Between Drs. Miedema and Korner, you'll have all the real, undiluted, clinically relevant information you need.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhzftS5iw-U

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if our government really wanted to lower healthcare costs, they would clean up the air, the water, and the food. Healthcare has become more and more corporate since the "affordable care act"~ maybe that was somewhere deep in the over 400 pages. Publicly traded corporations at that~ and their goal? earnings for shareholders... we are looking at the consequences of that.

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A couple of years ago, I found myself carrying about 30 extra pounds with a BMI in the “overweight” range. At about the same time, I found a book called “End Your Carb Confusion” by Dr. Eric Westman who is a board-certified obesity specialist, faculty at Duke University School of Medicine, and author of a textbook on obesity. Using the low carb diet advocated in this book, I was able to lose 30 pounds and keep it off. The diet involved taking several simple, but critical steps: avoid sugar (in all its forms) and white flour products, consume only whole-grain carbs, increase consumption of vegetables and berries, and increase protein consumption (fish and chicken for me). There are several diets in the book ranging from very low carb (ketogenic) to those with more liberal carb allowances. After losing the unwanted weight and reducing my BMI into the “normal weight” range (18.5-24.9), I continue to follow a liberalized, but still low-carb maintenance diet. I still avoid sugar, white flour products, and other sources of concentrated carbs and I am able to easily keep my weight in the normal range. I love broccoli and other vegetables and have no desire to eat sweets or junk food. I also love berries and nuts and eat these foods daily. I think that anyone could benefit from this type of diet and lose weight if they would give it a try, but I have had multiple obese friends pass on it in favor of the easier (and less healthful) path of drug treatment. Ozempic may help some people lose weight, but one thing that ozempic does not do is lead you to a healthy diet. Without a fundamental shift away from high carb foods you will remain dependent on the drug and at risk for adverse health consequences.

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